I wasn’t feeling very well. I had a stomach ache. I called my parents and asked if they would take care of my daughter so I could rest. I drove over and stayed a bit. The pain was left to right, it wasn’t just in one spot. I was sitting calmly on the couch listening to television with my dad when the pain got really bad. I remember saying to my dad very calmly that my stomach pain was worse than when I gave birth.

My dad brought me to the hospital and soon after I started vomiting nothing, but I couldn’t seem to stop. The nausea was so bad. They finally called my number to see the triage nurse. My dad jumped and moved sdoctors-office-1944117_1920o quickly toward triage and he didn’t see me fall when I tried to get up. Someone in the waiting room caught me and helped me up. The nurse put me in a bed and I was placed in the emergency ward.

There were so many people that I ended up in the corridor. It took a long while before a doctor came to see me. The doctor spoke down to me as if I was a child and asked me if I was in my time of the month because it could just be “lady pains.”

After reacting negatively to his comment, they gave me morphine for the pain and waited again. I was feeling much better when the doctor finally came over to see what was going on. He pushed on my stomach and I lost it. It was so painful. The doctor explained that since I was still feeling pain when on morphine it could mean a couple of things. The most likely possibilities were either appendicitis or it could be a problem with my ovaries. I would need to pass more tests for them to see what was going on. He made a joke about women being so much more complicated than men.

It did turn out to be appendicitis and the operation went well but was followed with complication. I was in so much pain, I kept asking for morphine and the nurse kept giving some to me. The pain wasn’t going away. It took a while for them to realise that it was leftover air from the operation stuck between my muscles and the skin. No amount of morphine would have worked. It’s simply a question of time, the air has to travel up to the shoulders and then out the pores of the skin.

I wanted to share my story so that others could know that appendicitis isn’t always specific to the right.