Statistics show that there is an obvious decrease in the number of baptisms in Quebec. This fact, in itself, doesn’t surprise me. It remains, however, that a number of parents still choose to offer sacraments to their children, whether by belief or tradition, to buy peace and so on.

As far as I’m concerned, no one should feel forced to baptise their child. Family pressure shouldn’t determine what you do, whether we are talking about christening your child or any other decisions. Regardless of what others think of it, this decision remains in the hands of the parents.

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My own parents admitted that the only reason why my brother and I were baptized what to make their parents happy. I remember being told that I had to do all the sacraments, even though I didn’t want to, or I would not be able to marry should I choose to in the future. It’s only later on, that I learned that 1. you can fall in love with someone of a different religion. 2. you can get married without any religious involvement 3. you can get all the sacraments later on in life, should you choose to.

I do not believe there is great value in having a child baptised or lying to them to get the sacraments if you don’t really believe or follow that religion.

My ex-husband and I are not religious. We are both Native American descendant and know the history of religion and the devastation they have incurred on our families. We both personally know family members who were forced into the residential school and what it did to them and their families. Our child is therefore not baptised. Certain members of the extended family had a very difficult time accepting it. My ex-mother-in-law (who converted well into her adulthood) still hopes that our child will decide to get baptised one day.

I know that even though the numbers show that there are fewer baptisms, there are still a lot of people who are still shocked and devastated that some children aren’t being baptised. According to the bible, baptisms are for adults or at least old enough to understand and consent. It supposed to be a personal choice, one that was reflected upon, not one done to us when we were too young to understand what was going on.