She can be anything she wants

Many young people still make career choices based on gender stereotypes. By fighting against them, we encourage children and youth to express their true personality and make informed choices about their future.

Even today, many young people will make choices based on gender stereotypes, choices that do not always reflect their deep desire for a professional future. Never give up on something you really want even if it looks impossible. In a world of instant gratification, it’s difficult to wait, but trust me when I say it’s much worse to look back in regret.

Career - Jobs - SexesYoung people have stubborn stereotypes about jobs that are appropriate for women and those that are appropriate for men. And these stereotypes are already present in children at a very young age, relayed and reinforced by the family, the media, the social environment in general and the school environment in particular. The activities and games offered to children and young people, the media, peers, places of socialization, etc., are often different for girls and boys. All these elements of education engender the transmission of stereotypes. By these choices, the girls are led, without even wanting it, to supposedly feminine interests, for example jobs where they will take care of others, and the boys towards interests called masculine, for example jobs where they will be in position of authority, or for which a certain physical force is required.

Everyone in the lives of children and youth (parents, educators, advocates) has an important role to play in countering stereotypes. By promoting stereotypical education and offering diverse models of workers, they will help the next generation not to make choices based on stereotypes and to fulfill their own fields of work. interest.

“She can be anything she wants.  She can sit at any table. She can trail-blaze a path, while humbly and gratefully recognizing those before her who paved the way.” – Dwane Johnson

The sexual division of labour is still very much present in the labour market both in terms of occupations and occupations, and of the places and functions held by women.

Management - Career - Jobs - SexesCurrently, stereotypical expectations and perceptions suggest that some areas of study are typically male, others female. Many young people are therefore bound by the limits when determining their occupation or profession. A lot of work remains to be done so that they can engage in a profession without their choice being tainted by sex stereotypes.

Gender stereotypes help to minimize the number of predominantly female job classes. A majority of women are in a smaller number of occupations than men. In addition, so-called female jobs continue to offer lower pay than male-dominated jobs.

To guide young people towards an informed professional choice, it is first necessary to show them all possible avenues without limiting them because of their sex.

“Well, I’m going to be a famous jazz musician. I’ve got it all figured out. I’ll be unappreciated in my own country, but my gutsy blues stylings will electrify the French. I’ll avoid the horrors of drug abuse, but I do plan to have several torrid love affairs, and I may or may not die young. I haven’t decided.”  – Lisa Simpson

As adults, it is important to stop and think about what we intentionally or unconsciously require of children and youth, and whether we distinguish between what a girl or a boy should do.

Every girl has the right to a voice .Living the life you want takes courage. People will disapprove and try to discourage you. Remember you’re entitled to shine and make big plans.

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